When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child. But, when I became a man, I put away the things of a child.  – St. Paul (1 Corinthians 13:11)

Dear fathers, mothers, and those that come from them – read this book!

Every healthy society throughout history has had cultural and ceremonial rites of passage to ensure that boys became men, because, as traditional wisdom knows, it won’t happen on its own.  Broadly speaking, our society does not have these rites, and the few that are left are being suppressed.

The widespread man-crisis is devastating men and families. Males today are stuck in perpetual adolescence and blatant insecurity, becoming either brutes or brats. Women lament the void of “good men”, giving up on finding one or carrying alone the heavy burden of single motherhood. Children, longing for a loving father, are let down, abandoned, or even abused.  Adult males are confused, lonely, self-loathing, mired in vice, and looking for meaning.  Something needs to change.

Jason Craig is a man who has been fighting this problem for a long time. As co-founder of Fraternus, Craig has been instrumental in cultivating intergenerational brotherhood and the recovery of mentoring.  Craig claims the man-crisis flows inevitably from a spiritual and general immaturity that follows upon the absence of rites of passage, the cultural means of bringing boys out of boyhood and into the fraternal life of men.  Men need to mature on a natural level, and with that they need to “grow up to salvation” (1 Peter 2:2).

In Leaving Boyhood Behind, Craig focuses on the essential need for males (boys and unfinished, empty, or despairing men) to leave behind the immaturity of sin and selfishness in order to grow up in virtue and brotherhood. This book simultaneously shows the depth of our problems today and how we can climb out of them.  Drawing on the wisdom of ancient rites of passage, the amazingly consistent lessons of classical literature and culture (including our own), and ultimately the revelation of the Perfect Man, Jesus Christ, Craig offers an incisive and practical approach for initiation into authentic masculinity.

Click here to pre-order from St. Joseph’s Farm (and help the author support his family).

Click here to pre-order from Amazon (and help Jeff Bezos build rockets).

Editorial Reviews

“A man once went to the doctor and complained that when he pressed upon his leg with his finger, it hurt, when he pressed on his arm, it hurt and when he pressed upon his head, it hurt. The man exclaimed to the doctor that it just hurt everywhere. The doctor informed him, after tests came back, that he had a broken finger. Like the man with the broken finger, everything will hurt if the source of pain is not identified and dealt with. Jason is revealing the source of brokenness, pain and dysfunction among our men today.

In order for men to be healthy leaders who can protect, provide for, and lead their families, there must be a plan to grow up and act like mature men, not boys who are still playing with toys while their lives and their families remain directionless. Jason Craig is insightful in pointing out the genesis of our problem, and he offers a compelling plan that I believe will powerfully impact the Church. Saint Paul said, ‘When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child; when I became a man, I gave up childish ways’ (1 Cor 13:11). If you are interested in giving up childish ways and becoming a man, this book is a must read.”

Jeff Cavins, creator of The Great Adventure Bible Study Systems

“Finally, a book on the Christian faith, and the crisis of manhood in our time, by someone who remembers that we have bodies, that a boy’s body is not like a girl’s body, that boys are supposed to become men, and the most important of all the natural truths regarding this matter, that manhood is something men have to win, amid real danger, and not something they naturally and gradually grow into. Or I might say that our crisis of manhood is to have forgotten that the passage from boyhood to manhood is necessarily a crisis. Jason Craig understands these things, and he has worked with boys and young men to develop in them the natural manhood that seeks its perfection in Christ. If you have a son, or if you want some clear and powerful advice on how to become a stronger and more effectual Christian man and father, you should read this book. Actually, you should get together a group of men in your parish and read it all together. Not only read it: put it to work. Words are cheap, as Craig knows. Actions are what matter.”

Anthony Esolen, author and professor of English Renaissance and classical literature at Thomas More College of Liberal Arts

“Jason Craig is a world-changer on one of the most important missions in the world right now: to recover the masculine spirit. His important work is about much more than winning a culture war. It’s about winning the war in the hearts of men to rediscover their identity, worth, purpose, and joy in Christ. Follow his banner, friends!”

Chris Stefanick, author, speaker, and founder of Real Life Catholic

“Manhood is facing an unprecedented crisis of cultural confusion. What, after all, is ‘authentic’ masculinity? We desperately need guides both wise and trustworthy that can help us to recover what we have lost. Jason Craig is just such a guide. In this powerful, succinct, and superbly written book, Craig shows us the meaning of the masculine vocation and how to live it. He reminds of essential truths like the importance of fatherly leadership, initiation, and discipline in the journey from boyhood to manhood. Leaving Boyhood Behind is strong medicine — a potent remedy to the crisis of masculine identity. Every man should read this book.”

Sam Guzman, author of The Catholic Gentleman: Living Authentic Manhood Today

“Jason Craig’s Leaving Boyhood Behind could not be more timely. At the root of our ecclesial crisis today is a crisis in masculinity. When boys go uninitiated into manhood, we find ourselves in situations like the one we are in: where men are not men. This book returns us to the rites that are the greatest longing of a boy’s heart, and the greatest blessing a father can bestow upon his son.”

James Baxter, co-founder & executive director of Exodus 90 and ThoseCatholicMen.com

“How do boys become men? We have come to the growing realization that we have an urgent crisis of masculinity in our society. Jason Craig has been at the forefront of getting to the bottom of this crisis and proposing practical solutions, rooted in the father-son relationship. Our future depends greatly on how we raise up the next generation of leaders. Thankfully, Mr. Craig gives us guidance on the work of forming our sons and in the process inspires us to become better men.”

R. Jared Staudt, Ph.D., Director of Formation for Catholic Schools and Catechesis for the Archdiocese of Denver

“Ever since King David told his son Solomon to ‘Be a man’ until this day, boys have struggled as to how exactly to be men. This is where this book comes in! Jason Craig gives us the ‘how to’ on becoming a man. This is a much needed and long overdue book, and I highly recommend it.”

Fr. Larry Richards, author of Be a Man

“God forms manly virtue through the brotherhood of men, on a common quest, in pursuit of a goal that is too lofty for them to achieve alone. Men become men as they move in action together. The walls of Jericho that separate men must come down. We need to get real with each other and challenge and equip each other. As the walls that separate us come down, the walls of the temple must be rebuilt. As in the days of Nehemiah, men of valor must step into the breach, one working, the other standing guard with sword and shield in hand. Jason’s book is the ram’s horn sounding loudly with a call to manliness.”

Bear Woznick, founder of Deep Adventure Ministries, speaker, author, and world champion surfer

“God’s twin blessings of family and the Church have come under grave assault; the blessing of marriage is being rejected or redefined, and grave scandals and heretical ideas are tearing the Church apart. What’s needed is for Catholic men to renew their commitment to be self-sacrificial spiritual fathers whose highest purpose is to lead their wives and children to heaven. In Leaving Boyhood Behind, Jason Craig describes the ‘man-crisis’ and offers deep and accessible wisdom about how men can grow into fatherhood and lead their sons to the joyful calling of Catholic masculinity. Men who grasp and live out this wisdom will experience growing joy as they enter into the challenging task of restoring the family and rebuilding the Catholic Church.”

Matthew James Christoff, The New Emangelization

“St. John Paul II said, ‘The future of the world and of the Church passes through the family.’ Leadership for the future of the Catholic family requires mature fatherhood, following in the footsteps of Saint Joseph. How do we raise and spiritually form such men in the midst of a society that encourages dissipation and perpetual adolescence? In Leaving Boyhood Behind: Reclaiming Catholic Brotherhood, Jason Craig clearly, forcefully, and knowledgably shows how the passage from boyhood to manhood is accomplished in the twenty-first century. Each chapter is packed with a blend of penetrating wisdom and practical advice. This book is, by far, the most important resource on raising godly young men that I’ve ever encountered. I not only give it my highest recommendation, but my sincere hope is that the fathers and mothers raising my grandsons will read it and heed it.”

Steve Wood, founder of St. Joseph’s Covenant Keepers, host of Faith & Family Radio

“An awesome book! Leaving Boyhood Behind is a welcome voice in the building crescendo of contributions furthering Catholic male spirituality. Jason Craig explores the transition from boyhood to mature manhood, combining well-researched inquiry, sacred Scripture, and practical, real world examples in a way that both inspires and challenges men to take their spiritual lives to the next level. This book is an invaluable resource for all Catholics who care about the intellectual, physical, and spiritual development of the next generation of men.”

Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers, author of Behold the Man: A Catholic Vision of Male Spirituality

“This book on initiation into manhood is much needed in our time. I can’t think of anyone more qualified than Jason to write it. He has lived this reality personally and has led many men and teenagers through this process in his work and ministry. I have read other books on this topic, but none as well researched and integrated with our Catholic Faith.”

Dr. Bob Schuchts, author, speaker, and founder of the John Paul II Healing Center

  • Larry Bud

    OK, again today on 12/28/2018 Disqus send me email that AGAIN, Dominic Vieira has posted here. He posted his comment again. And again, it’s not here. What’s the problem?

    Dominic, here is the reply I wrote to you. It will look silly without your comment to provide context, but you know what you wrote… even if no one else can see it:

    Dominic, thank you for your well worded and polite response. Let me clarify my position.

    What I mean to suggest, is that the book addresses a made-up problem that is entirely the creation of the Catholic media industry, and it’s being used to fund their books and talks and retreats and etc. And that’s just wrong.

    The #1 problem in Catholic life today is not the proposition of a “man crisis” by Christoff and the other self-appointed voices. Their message is not open for debate, because they control the soapboxes. So they circle their wagons and pat each other on the back. It’s group-think at its finest.

    But they are wrong, wrong, wrong. No, the problem is in Catholic parish culture, or rather the total lack of it.

    Why do I feel so strongly about this? In the parish of my youth, and only two or three decades ago, everyone contributed to the parish’s social well-being, as had been done for generations before them. Fundraisers were a total community activity. Children learned by example about the value of volunteering, cooperation, and good social behaviors. Everyone had a role to play.

    Artificial “male spirituality” in the way that our author and his reviewers imagine it, simply did not exist and would have been a spectacular failure if it was attempted, just like it’s a failure now. Rather, the men of the parish met whenever work was needed, like grounds work or light construction. They brought their sons with them, again setting an example and showing the importance of contributing to parish life. That was the “message” delivered. Among “ordinary” Cathoics, the concern was never to be “devout” but to be a good parish citizen, from which church attendance naturally follows. And for the most part, it’s all these “ordinary” Catholics who have been walking away from the Church, and not returning.

    And to address another point Dominic made, I don’t think lack of interest or lack of organizers are to blame. I’ve asked and I’ve volunteered, many times, and I’ve been ignored. And I doubt I’m the only one. Parishes don’t even want to try.

    I believe that social activities and personal involvement are just as necessary and important as “doctrinal rigor and respectful worship”. Really. Dominic suggested that people leave parishes that “have embraced community and abandoned dogma”. That’s not true. People may leave parishes over objections to (say) preaching or music, but such parishes did not also necessarily “embrace community”, whatever that means to him. Every parish needs to function as a community, and none in my area currently do.

    Look around your town. You’ll see social life in every congregation EXCEPT the Catholics. The social aspect and obligation of Catholic parish life completely died over the last generation or so. If blame is to be assigned, I see that my area parishes have paid employees doing work that men would gladly do for free, if anyone would only ask. Parish fundraisers have been replaced with slick “campaigns” at the diocesan level.

    Restoring a minimal level of social life in most parishes is the necessary first step in drawing people back. Yes indeed Dominic, the “power of a weekly carnival and a youth organization” and things like it, are exactly what’s needed now. Catholic media (books and speakers and retreats) and the babble of “new evangelization” simply cannot do this, as they speak only to the choir which accomplishes nothing.

    • Dominic Vieira

      Hopefully, Larry, this will not become a one-sided post, but I would like to respond to you. Even if Disqus decides to withhold my responses from the wider world, I am enjoying this conversation with you.

      I agree with you that parish life has suffered and that this decline cannot have resulted simply from a lack of a specific male spirituality. In that much you, I think, are absolutely correct. Moreover, I agree that a parish must function as a community. And you recognize, as we all do, that something, or some combination of things, must be causing that failure of a parish to function as a living organism; unless I am mistaken, you would largely blame centralization and specialization–the preference for top-down control and employment of professionals over locally organized fundraisers and use of volunteers. I would not disagree with that, but I do not say that centralization causes the failure as much as it results from it.

      The crisis in manhood appears to be the most likely suspect. I doubt it is the sole suspect, but I do not think we should underestimate its influence. But therein we run into an additional problem: what is sparking this crisis in manhood? If men are not engaging in parish life, why not? Are they being driven away? Or are they losing interest? I believe that the authors of books like this one are trying to answer those questions.

      I think we must get to the heart of the matter if we are to solve it. Cutting to the chase, I think that “busyness” leads to neglect which leads to forgetfulness and eventually to absence and personal emptiness. And advances in social technology are certainly not helping to repair the more conventional modes of parish life; they are revolutionizing and replacing many other conventional social interactions as well.

      And even though Catholic Tradition holds riches for men in spiritual need, those men need to be convinced to seize upon those riches. Moreover, Catholic Tradition lives in local Catholic traditions, and the more those traditions are replaced or revised unnecessarily the more men–who naturally incline towards tradition and ritual–will be tempted to turn from the Church that seems to have turned on them.

      In short, personal struggles are at the heart of every man’s decision to leave his faith and his Church behind. Whether those struggles are facially economic, social, religious or familial, they are sourced in a deeper, more personal struggle which cries out for spiritual sustenance. Rich, vibrant parish community can bolster a man who may be struggling spiritually, but the best help for him lies in the life that he cultivates between himself and God first. That is why it is important to focus on spirituality–not because parish life is inconsequential, but because strong parish life derives from strong personal spiritual life.

      Whether those goals are being pursued well by this author and others like him is another matter altogether.

      Regards,

      • Larry Bud

        Dominic, at this moment your latest response is visible. Hopefully it will stay that way.

        I would not say that parishes have a “preference for top-down control and employment of professionals”. I just don’t know if that’s true or not. But however it happened, it has happened. You say “I do not say that centralization causes the failure as much as it results from it.” I can’t agree with that either. I don’t know when parishes started hiring employees instead of relying on volunteers. It’s certainly less hassle, but at the cost of denying men (and women) an important social role.

        I just will not accept “The crisis in manhood appears to be the most likely suspect.” No, no, no. This is what the speakers and the authors and the Catholic media have decided to be the root cause of all our problems. I just can’t agree with that.

        You ask “If men are not engaging in parish life, why not? Are they being driven away?” I would say two things: one, men and women and families are leaving the church. Men alone cannot be blamed for this, and should not meekly accept the charge. Two, I’ll say again that the social aspect of parish life gave people a powerful reason to stay. Their parish was a significant part of their lives. Lacking it, people have been leaving. That’s quite different from being “driven away”. When people leave, no one notices because no one ever knew they were there, and the only notice taken is the parish office computer which spits out a reminder to use the offering envelopes.

        You have quoted another part of Christoff’s theory, that men “naturally incline towards tradition and ritual”. Nope, can’t buy into that either. Parishes that focus on tradition and ritual are just as socially dormant as the others, as far as I can see.

        Lastly, I’ll also disagree with your claim that “strong parish life derives from strong personal spiritual life”. I know it seems like I’m disagreeing with every point you make, but I think you’re repeating “theory” when in reality, “theory” and “practice” are quite different. And that’s the core of the problem we have today.

      • Dominic Vieira

        Larry,

        I agree that men cannot and should not accept blame for the failures that are wracking the Church unless specific evidence supports a specific charge of blame.

        What do you think lies–in theory or practice–at the heart of a strong parish life, if not a strong personal commitment to live out Christ’s call to love God and to love neighbor? Why have parishes suddenly started lacking cohesion and vitality?

        While the social aspect of parish life can give people reason to stay in a particular parish or even in the faith altogether, that kind of “devotion” is neither going to last nor yield much, if any, harvest. I think that the two chief reasons pews are emptying are (1) scandal, whether real or perceived, and (2) “political” disagreements, whether conservative or liberal.

        Ultimately, my diagnosis hinges on this: parishes that lack people with strong personal devotion to their faith will not survive either socially or otherwise–they certainly will not thrive. Many protestant parishes thrive because their theology hinges exclusively on the individual’s radical devotion to and deep personal relationship with Christ. Catholic parishes of every stripe that have people similarly devoted also do better than parishes that lack such people. Catholic and protestant parishes that condone hypocrisy, whether actively or passively, will suffer. That hypocrisy can be held theologically or it can be lived out practically. Either way, hypocrisy drives people out of the pews.

        The only Catholic parish that will truly thrive will foster true personal devotion to Christ and His Church. And that personal devotion,especially if it is well-tended by doctrinal veracity and sound theology, will yield fruit in a vibrant communal life. It will develop slowly, like all the best things, but it will develop.

        Regards,

      • Larry Bud

        Dominic, this decline has not been sudden. It’s been a slow slide over one or maybe two generations. I’ve seen it happen.

        We seem to be at a fundamental disagreement. You suggest that Protestant-style spirituality is “the answer”. Our author and his friends agree, and are making good money selling it to parish and diocesan administrators who eagerly buy it because a) it’s not their money they are spending, b) it takes no real effort on their part to book a conference room and pop in a DVD or introduce a speaker.

        I disagree 100% with that. I can’t say it any other way, and I will keep saying it: The social aspect of parish life is (was) just as important as the religious/church-y aspect. It cannot be ignored. And it’s not “hypocrisy” to say so. The fruits are obvious.

        A fallen away Catholic, or even a life-long Catholic like myself who stubbornly hangs on when most of my generation left long long ago, will not be drawn in by any of the “media initiatives” in today’s Church. We just don’t want retreats or lectures or books like our author and his friends are selling. But a carnival or a CYO night? Yes, I’d attend that. I’d volunteer in any way needed. That’s what being Catholic means to me.

      • LarryM99 what

  • Larry Bud

    On 12/18/2018, Disqus sent me an email with an intelligent polite response to my comment written by Dominic Vieira. I would like to reply to it, but it has disappeared! What happened to it?

    • Dominic Vieira

      I wish I knew. Happily (or unhappily) I saved a copy of it before posting. Perhaps Disqus will not swallow it this time.

      Based on your criticism, Larry, I wonder what you consider would be valid praise of the book. Most praises of books, speakers or ideas are sung by outspoken supporters of the book, speaker or idea. Few, if any, books are praised by their critics as well as their supporters. I would like to speak to some of your other points, as well.

      The simple and obvious truth, as you put it, is neither so simple, nor so obvious.

      True, the Church as a community has suffered in the past several decades from depreciating attendance, from a lack of social cohesion, and from a limping parish communal life. However, those wounds are beyond the power of a weekly carnival and a youth organization to heal.

      In the first place, those events need organizers, staffers, and leaders of integrity who will do the necessary tasks not only to make the events function, but also to make sure that they pursue the goal of building true Catholic community in each member and among all the members. Without men to attend them, those organizations will at best only half-succeed; without a message that will draw in men and keep them coming back, those organizations will quickly atrophy; and without men who know how to be men, neither a meaningful message nor a successful organization can be created. So, yes, parishes need at least some semblance of a Catholic male spirituality.

      In the second place, social life does not draw men to church and keep them there. Doctrinal rigor and respectful worship do. The Church exodus occurs precisely in those Christian denominations and in those Catholic parishes that have embraced community and abandoned dogma. Moreover, devout fathers are the foremost reason the faith is propagated and maintained generationally in Catholic families; it is also the primary motivator for the conversions of whole families to Catholicism.

      In the third place, considering that men make up the entire hierarchy of the Church, it would be foolish–even downright mad–to ignore the problems which affect not only those already in positions of authority, but also those who may someday be ordained to those offices simply because they are men. Male malaise is a real problem; it needs viable solutions that reach men where they are not where they might have been sixty years ago.

      In the fourth place, St. John Paul II initiated the New Evangelization to revitalize the Church that had lost the allure of a desirable Bride in part because there were few men being raised to imitate the fullness of the life of Her true and only Bridegroom. This book seems responsive to that call, especially to men, to re-engage with the Church, so that She may re-engage with the world. The book is not meant to “reach” ex-Catholics, but to fortify those who will have to reach out to them. It is a call to adventure, to community, to discipleship, not an apology.

      Finally, it would be better to read and sharply criticize the book and what it propounds rather than beat a war drum against the manner in which it is advertised.

      Regards,

  • Dominic Vieira

    Based on your criticism, Larry, I wonder what you consider would be valid praise of the book. Most praises of books, speakers or ideas are sung by outspoken supporters of the book, speaker or idea. Few, if any, books are praised by their critics as well as their supporters. I would like to speak to some of your other points, as well.

    The simple and obvious truth, as you put it, is neither so simple, nor so obvious.

    True, the Church as a community has suffered in the past several decades from depreciating attendance, from a lack of social cohesion, and from a limping parish communal life. However, those wounds are beyond the power of a weekly carnival and a youth organization to heal.

    In the first place, those events need organizers, staffers, and leaders of integrity who will do the necessary tasks not only to make the events function, but also to make sure that they pursue the goal of building true Catholic community in each member and among all the members. Without men to attend them, those organizations will at best only half-succeed; without a message that will draw in men and keep them coming back, those organizations will quickly atrophy; and without men who know how to be men, neither a meaningful message nor a successful organization can be created. So, yes, parishes need at least some semblance of a Catholic male spirituality.

    In the second place, social life does not draw men to church and keep them there. Doctrinal rigor and respectful worship do. The Church exodus occurs precisely in those Christian denominations and in those Catholic parishes that have embraced community and abandoned dogma. Moreover, devout fathers are the foremost reason the faith is propagated and maintained generationally in Catholic families; it is also the primary motivator for the conversions of whole families to Catholicism.

    In the third place, considering that men make up the entire hierarchy of the Church, it would be foolish–even downright mad–to ignore the problems which affect not only those already in positions of authority, but also those who may someday be ordained to those offices simply because they are men. Male malaise is a real problem; it needs viable solutions that reach men where they are not where they might have been sixty years ago.

    In the fourth place, St. John Paul II initiated the New Evangelization to revitalize the Church that had lost the allure of a desirable Bride in part because there were few men being raised to imitate the fullness of the life of Her true and only Bridegroom. This book seems responsive to that call especially to men to re-engage with the Church, so that She may re-engage with the world. The book is not meant to “reach” ex-Catholics, but to fortify those who will have to reach out to them. It is a call to adventure, to community, to discipleship, not an apology.

    Finally, it would be better to read and sharply criticize the book and what it propounds rather than beat a war drum against the manner in which it is advertised.

    Regards,

  • Larry Bud

    It’s very telling that every reviewer of this book is a member of the so-called “Catholic media”, a self-appointed circle of experts that the author is apparently trying to gain entry to. Their group-think is to blame “men” for all the woes of the Church and of society at large. Many of them travel the Catholic speaking circuits spouting this babble.

    Instead of berating men for various unspecified offenses, how about admitting the simple and obvious truth? We are now well into our second generation of a steady flow of Catholics out of the Church. Parishes have turned into cold unfriendly corporate institutions with no social or community life.

    To the extent that the author’s message has any element of truth at all, it’s not going to reach the ex-Catholics who (especially in the current environment) are not going to return.

    Parishes don’t need “Catholic male spirituality”. I realize that speakers are making good money selling this stuff but their audience is ever-shrinking. No, parishes need the CYO and the weekend carnival. Who will give talks and write books about that? Does anyone remember?

    • Dominic Vieira

      Based on your criticism, Larry, I wonder what you consider would be valid praise of the book. Most praises of books, speakers or ideas are sung by outspoken supporters of the book, speaker or idea. Few, if any, books are praised by their critics as well as their supporters. I would like to speak to some of your other points, as well.

      The simple and obvious truth, as you put it, is neither so simple, nor so obvious.

      True, the Church as a community has suffered in the past several decades from depreciating attendance, from a lack of social cohesion, and from a limping parish communal life. However, those wounds are beyond the power of a weekly carnival and a youth organization to heal.

      In the first place, those events need organizers, staffers, and leaders of integrity who will do the necessary tasks not only to make the events function, but also to make sure that they pursue the goal of building true Catholic community in each member and among all the members. Without men to attend them, those organizations will at best only half-succeed; without a message that will draw in men and keep them coming back, those organizations will quickly atrophy; and without men who know how to be men, neither a meaningful message nor a successful organization can be created. So, yes, parishes–and indeed the Church as a whole–must develop at least some semblance of a Catholic male spirituality.

      In the second place, social life does not draw men to church and keep them there. Doctrinal rigor and respectful worship do. The Church exodus occurs precisely in those Christian denominations and in those Catholic parishes that have embraced community and abandoned dogma. Moreover, devout fathers are the foremost reason the faith is propagated and maintained generationally in Catholic families; it is also the primary motivator for the conversions of whole families to Catholicism.

      In the third place, considering that men make up the entire hierarchy of the Church, it would be foolish–even downright mad–to ignore the problems which affect not only those men already in positions of authority, but also those who will someday be ordained to those offices simply because they are men. Male malaise is a real problem; it needs viable solutions that reach men where they are not where they might have been sixty years ago.

      In the fourth place, St. John Paul II preached the New Evangelization to revitalize the Church that had lost the allure of a desirable Bride in part because there were few men being raised to imitate the fullness of the life of Her true and only Bridegroom. This book seems responsive to that call especially to men to re-engage with the Church, so that She may re-engage with the world. The book is not meant to “reach” ex-Catholics, but to fortify those who will have to reach out to them. It is a call to adventure, to community, to discipleship, not an apology.

      Finally, it would be better to read and sharply criticize the book and what it propounds rather than beat a war drum against the manner in which it is advertised.

      Regards,

    • Phil Alcoceli

      Really, Larry? Now, according to just you, we have a “Catholic Media Conspiracy” to bring a Blame-The-Men-Movement for profit and personal gain? How many millions do you think they’ll make? Trillions? Where is your evidence of the big money they “are making selling this stuff”, as you say? Really? It’s noteworthy that you put the word men in quotation marks in your second sentence. Freudian slip. No real men exist or should exist at all for you do they? The Anti-Culture of Death has fought for decades against men and you want to keep it that way, don’t you? The Church’s enemies are openly and publicly proud of it but you say it doesn’t exist. They talk over and over about “poisonous testosterone” and “toxic masculinity”, continually slam down real men and boys, etc. but you have never heard of it. Wow! What planet do you live in?

      Sure, you deny the reality and the gravity of the situation like so many deny that the Devil exists, Willful Blinding Denial, Satan’s best strategy. Your very best options to bring men back, as you say, are Catholic Youth Organizations and weekend carnivals? Will you have craft fairs and singing contests together with those, too? Flower festivals? Interpretive dance competitons? No Catholic Youth Organizations or any other beneficial groups or activities will return or happen in the Church without holy and strong male leadership. Without that Catholic men leadership, Churches always fall into spiritual entropy and become just another generic social charity group or a Protestant-ish hybrid that attracts no one, especially men. Write books about weekend carnivals? We all greatly need Mr. Craig’s book and even more so do you.

      • Larry Bud

        Phil, I’ve had quite enough of your personal attacks. Please do not respond to my comments any more unless it’s in a spirit of actual discussion, for I shall not engage with you further.

      • Phil Alcoceli

        Personal attacks? So that’s how you call it when confronted by The Truth? It was you who started, not by acting in a “spirit of actual discussion”, as you say, but by directing a slanderous, underhanded, unsubstantiated, cowardly personal attack against those writers who, thanks to God, engage against the Anti-Culture of Death that has their ideological guns engaged on destroying Real Men.

        In your first paragraph you right away start by saying: “Many of them travel the Catholic speaking circuits spouting this babble”, then on your last you say: “I realize that speakers are making good money selling this stuff but their audience is ever-shrinking”, two lies in just one sentence. Be man enough to take responsibility for your actions and words, grow up according to God’s Will and the Church’s Teaching and correct yourself with God’s Grace. That’s what a Catholic man is. We are all repentant sinners here at war with sin for love of God and others, even though, like Jesus, we are greatly hated for that (Matthew 10:22). You are always welcome to be engaged by Jesus The Real Truth and join us. Praise be to God for his Tough Love!! Satan is a Pampering False Mother. Choose wisely!!